Epic Scottish Adventures

Book Now!
Find out more
Advertisement

The Road To The Isles

The Road to the Isles is a very scenic and historical route from Fort William to Mallaig

The Road to the Isles begins to the west of Corpach on the A830 and works its way west towards Mallaig, where Caledonian MacBrayne Ferries take visitors to Armadale on the Isle of Skye.

Along this scenic route there are lots of places to stop, enjoy the scenery, appreciate the peace and quiet.

Loch Eil is the first major landmark on your left as your travel towards Fassfern and Glenfinnan.  This sea loch is home to Outward Bound Locheil - the outdoor adventure centre. Loch Eil is also used to farm mussels which grow well in the cool, clean waters of the loch. Locheilside is a mix of small crofts and dwellings with some nice scenery to enjoy throughout the year. Ben Nevis is particularly impressive from Loch Eil. In the summer months, the Jacobite Steam Train works its way along the lochside on its way out west - there are a few good places to see the train pass on its journey. (the views of the train in this fantastic scenery would be a lot more enjoyable if someone would realise that the scrub trees need to be cut back every few years.)

At Kinlocheil, near Fassfern there's a train stop and if you take the junction on the left at the head of the loch, signposted A861, there's very pleasant tour around the west shore which eventually takes your to Treislaig, where a small ferry will take you over Loch Linnhe to Fort William, or you can continue down to Ardgour, and cross with your car over Corran Narrows.

Proceeding westwards, the next village is Glenfinnan. This is a terrific place and we have a section all about Glenfinnan on the site. Glenfinnan and Loch Shiel should be on your "Must Visit" list of places. Check out Loch Shiel Cruises for fabulous wildlife trips

The road climbs up the hill and after a few miles you'll see Loch Eilt on your left. This is a good place to see the Steam Train.

From Loch Eilt the road takes you to Lochailort and then over a gradual descent, back to sea-level at the viaduct which carries the West Highland Line through the hills to Arisaig. From Arisaig to Mallaig is possibly the prettiest section of the  route. Less mountainous, but numerous beaches and great sea views bring in the changes of this interesting  journey. If you are traveling on to Skye, your find the ferry at Mallaig going back and forth the Sound of Sleat to Armadale. If not, this area is well worth exploring, including beautiful Loch Morar - a huge fresh water loch..

From Mallaig there are sea routes to the Small Isles and to Inverie on the shore of Loch Nevis. You can also walk over the hills to Inverie to enjoy some good food at the Old Forge - Britain's most remote pub. There is of course a lot more to the Road to the Isles - the history, the geology, the wildlife and of course the people who live and work here.

Read next

Explore these featured listings

The Lime Tree Hotel
The Lime Tree in Fort William is a Small Hotel, Restaurant and high quality Art Gallery offering you unique accommodation in a convenient location in the Highlands of Scotland. Whether you choose to relax at The Lime Tree, enjoy the spectacular mountains and landscape, bag a Munro, tackle world championship mountain bike track at Nevis Range, take the Jacobite steam train on the road to the Isles, or choose to immerse yourself in the Art culture or events at the Lime Tree, this family owned hotel in Fort William will provide the idea base to explore all Lochaber has to offer. Your Scottish Highland holiday in the Outdoor Capital of the UK will always be memorable . This stylish  hotel in Fort William offers fantastic views of Loch Linnhe and the hills beyond, 9 stylish double, twin and family bedrooms, a contemporary restaurant, a fantastic Art Galley hosting National shows, comfy lounges with open fires, map room, bike storage and Wireless broadband. OUR CHEF The Head Chef at the Lime Tree restaurant is Andrew Cook. Having previously worked at the Lime Tree, he then worked a stint at luxury country hotel Kilcamb Lodge in Strontian, before returning to the Lime Tree to take up the role of head chef. The menu focuses on fresh, locally sourced ingredients made into something special by the skilled team of chefs. Where possible, everything is made in house including breads, preserves, ice creams, and sausages and black pudding at breakfast.   The restaurant is multi award winning - Relish Good Food Guide 'Top Twenty Small Scottish Restaurants', Visit Scotland 'Taste of the Best' award, Michelin and Good Food Guide listed.  REVIEWS 'Rapidly earning a great reputation as destination eating in Fort William. great interiors with contemporary menu, this Restaurant successfully combines with its art gallery and accommodations' Wendy Barrie, The Scottish Good Food Guide 
No data
No data